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FAQ

FAQ

Our Most Frequently Asked Questions

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What are types of pain?

Acute pain can last a moment; rarely does it become chronic pain. Chronic pain persists for long periods. It is resistant to most medical treatments and cause severe problems.

Why Are My Joints So Stiff? What Can I Do?

As you age, your cartilage -- the spongy material that protects the ends of your bones -- begins to dry out and stiffen. Your body also makes less synovial fluid, the stuff that acts like oil to keep your joints moving smoothly. The result: Your joints may not move as freely as they used to. It sounds a little crazy, but the best thing you can do is keep on trucking. Synovial fluid requires movement to keep your joints loose.

Should I take pain medication only when I have a lot of pain?

No. Don't wait until pain becomes severe to take pain medication. Pain is easier to control when it is mild. You should take your pain medication regularly, just as prescribed. Sometimes this means taking medicine on a regular schedule, even when you don't feel pain.

Should I tell my medical provider that I am having pain?

Yes. Your health care provider needs to assess your pain, so it is very important for your health care team to know if you are in pain.

Some days my acute pain is much worse. What can I do?

You might notice at times that you are in more pain than usual (such as at the end of a tiring day or as a result of certain activities). If you notice that certain activities contribute to your pain, or that you feel worse at certain times of the day, medication can be taken prior to the activity (or time of day) to help prevent the pain from occurring. Always be sure to follow your doctor's instructions.

How should I describe my pain to my doctor?

Describe your pain clearly and in as much detail as possible. Most doctors and nurses ask you to describe your level of pain on a scale.

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